Tuesday, July 28, 2009

7 comments:

Danielle said...

the last time i wrote by hand was just a couple of days ago when i wrote a letter to my "pen-pal" in africa..yes i still have a lot of my mail going on by hand and snail mail...lol*

maybe thats not really an interesting thing..but what might interest you is the fact that i wrote all my stuff yb hand until about 3 years ago...all my stories..even my first book i wrote by hand..and one of my cousins had to type them later on for me..when i bought my first laptop it sat still paked for almost 8 month in a corner...yep..and when i write a story now i still make my brainstorming and my notes and developments by hand..i sit down and write into notebooks which i actually store..lol..and i also write a diary since i was 13..i used to write every day in it..but since about 2-3 years i write all 3-4 days..but still i do it..:-)...anyway..totally love this post and the idea to write about the actual writing...and i like your "handwriting"...:-)

oh..spam word is: subie

Nikki Magennis said...

Ah, letters written by hand! Such a treat, compared to emails. It feels like even postcards are strange treasures lately, so much realer than a facebook message.

I am impressed that you keep a diary, Danielle, and that you still write out stories by hand. Sometimes it really helps, yes, and I wonder if the tone/flavour/pace of the story is affected by the means of writing.

Danielle said...

yeah,,they are..thats why i have two huge boxes where i keep all my postcards and letters because i simply love to re-read them..its a sat thing..i printed out all the emails which went back and forth between me and my last lover..its a big, thick pile of paper..a pile of paper..nothing more..it dont speaks to me..its so anonym:-(..i have a friend from france who writes the most beautiful letters with a pretty handwriting along with really precious drawings ect...they could never be replaced by emails..i still even have letters from my grandfather to my grandmother..and my cousin nina keeps the most touching love letters from her late father to her mother ...

coming back to the stories..i just have to start by hand..i cant sit down in front of the laptop and just write..this empty screen..the blinking courser..naw now way..i have to start by hand..write fast..must be able to go back and forth..add little notes in the middle..scratch them out again..when i m done with that i can use the laptop..but i have to start by hand...

Shanna Germain said...

Oh, yes. This was so nice. I tend to write longhand only when I must -- I don't have my laptop or I'm on a bus or I'm waiting somewhere. And then I rediscover the sensual pleasure of it. Hard pen in hand, the slide of paper beneath my fingers, the re-discovery of making something appear, something messy and wholly mine (after all, how long have we had our penmanship? So long. And no one else has one like it). Something that feels somehow more true, more visceral, more human.

And then, just as quickly, I'm tired of it. My hand aches, the writing grows messy, the page grows messier. I want my clean black letters on a white screen again. And I return to the thing that is certain, at least for me, easier. But maybe not as real. Or not as good. Or not as whole...

Justine Elyot said...

You have that kind of sophisticated handwriting that people will take seriously though. Mine is rounded and schoolgirly and rude words look completely wrong in it.

I was a teenage diarist, too, so the act of writing longhand always makes me a bit too confessional and personal. The keyboard frees me from all of that.

You always make fascinating posts - this is such an interesting question.

Craig Sorensen said...

I still write probably 10-20% of what I do in longhand. All my poetry starts that way. I often work on story ideas and concepts in longhand, and do some editing that way.

I'd try your idea, a handwritten blog, but then people would be saying "is that an E or a Q?"

Nikki Magennis said...

I don't know, though, I have some lovely emails that I've kept - I do love letters, but there's some kind of ephemeral charm in electronic messages, perhaps?

Interesting how some start by hand and some type. For me, typing has become an extension of my thoughts - or thoughtless, maybe.

And fascinating, Justine, how it seems to change your writing! I get how a keyboard can free one, yes. (also, thanks v much re 'sophisticated'. That is my *best* writing, otherwise usually illegible.)

I can see how poetry might write better in longhand, Craig. It makes the words more present, doesn't it?