Monday, August 06, 2007

Today's post brought you the letters E and F



E is for Exotic and F is for Fetish, edited by Alison Tyler, published by Cleis Press


I'm all behind with the alphabet books. Our postman took an inordinately long time to deliver them, (it must be tricky riding a bicycle in a kilt with a heavy post-bag over one shoulder) but now I have E and F in my hands, and they're just as gorgeous as I thought they'd be!

Weird, too, how once a story's in print it looks totally different. Re-reading, I kept muttering 'I didn't write that,' and checking the original and realising that yes, I did write exactly that. This is a cool thing, because sometimes reading your own work it's like reading someone else's. And you can notice things that stick out, like how much I love the word 'cleave'. Cleave. Obviously, subconsciously my favourite word.

I'm rambling. What I meant to say was - get hold of the alphabet books at Amazon, and check out Alison Tyler's blog for more snips, or lust bites for yet more. If you're wondering which one to get - better just buy the whole alphabet. My stories are in stellar company, rubbing shoulders with gems from Shanna Germain, Jeremy Edwards, Kristina Lloyd, Madelynne Ellis, Mathilde Madden, Rachel Kramer Bussel, Thomas S Roche...and more and more. (And of course, every book contains one of Alison Tyler's delicious stories too). Wowee zowee. I'm truly honoured.

14 comments:

Alana said...

Cleave is a fine word, strong with its "v' sound and yet softened, almost oist, with the "cl" sound. Yup, fine word, indeed.

Congrats on your ABC stories, Nx.

Alana said...

oist = moist. Thanks.

Nikki Magennis said...

Oist is good too! Cheers, Alana...

kathrynoh said...

Congratulations :)

kristina lloyd said...

Gosh, that's a mighty fine brassiere you're wearing, Ms Magennis.

I like cleave because it has two virtually opposite meanings - split and cling to. It's like sex from two different perspectives. I haven't started reading the lastest dirty letters but when I do I'll pay special attention to your, um, cleavage.

Congrats! This is such a gorgeous series to be in.

Nikki Magennis said...

Grazie, Kathryn and Kristina!

I originally put the dictionary definitions of cleave in that post but I thought it was too wordnerdy. May as well play to the house though:

cleave (1)
"to split," O.E. cleofan "to split, separate" (class II strong verb, past tense cleaf, past participle clofen), from P.Gmc. *kleubanan, from PIE base *gleubh- "to cut, slice." The old, strong p.t. clave was still alive at the time of the King James Bible; and the p.p. cloven survives, though mostly in compounds.

The sense of "cleft between a woman's breasts in low-cut clothing" is first recorded 1946, when it was defined in a "Time" magazine article as the "Johnston Office trade term for the shadowed depression dividing an actress' bosom into two distinct sections" [Aug. 5].


(Dunno what PIE means but I understand the titty bit.)

Jeremy Edwards said...

Hi, Nikki! I'm so proud to be in "F" with you and the others!

I love words that can mean their opposites. In the U.S., you can write a check to pay a bill, and yet you can use a twenty-dollar bill to pay your restaurant check. If only these usages could be hooked together, we'd have a perpetual-paying machine! That's not nearly as sexy as Kristina's analysis of cleave, though.

I'm guessing PIE has something to do with Indo-European roots. (When your Romance or Germanic dye job begins to grow out, that's what you see.)

Nikki Magennis said...

Hey Jeremy! Me too! Even my mum loves the covers!

Anyway. Thanks for the explanation of PIE.

I now have a picture of a waitress with brown eyes, blonde hair(roots showing) and a nose stud, in a low cut top, serving cherry pie and kulfi icecream. And there's big lovehearts on her apron. And lederhosen underneath. Works for me. I like this etymology stuff.

Smut Girl said...

It took me a week to come say that I loved your story in F. Loved it! I hid in my room and read it while my daughter had a sleepover. I don't have E yet, but I think E will be as good as F...and A,B,C,D...and so on.

xoxo
Sommer

Nikki Magennis said...

Aw, thank you, Sommer. That was a vengeance story, sort of!

Alison Tyler said...

Your stories define what these books are about to me. Little shiny gems that glimmer in your mind long after you put the book down.

Nikki Magennis said...

Grazie, grazie, grazie, Alison. Now I really am puffing up my chest! I'm going to collect all these shiny comments like a magpie...

Saskia Walker said...

I kept muttering 'I didn't write that,' and checking the original and realising that yes, I did write exactly that. This is a cool thing, because sometimes reading your own work it's like reading someone else's.

I always think that too, when reading mine in print! Glad it's not just me ;)

I loved "Essence," superb read, Nikki. Haven't got F yet but I will. :)

Nikki Magennis said...

Hey, Saskia, how nice to hear from you! Thank you, I'm so glad you liked 'Essence'!