Wednesday, March 14, 2007

Guilty pleasures

If, today, you were to cancel all your usual plans, pull a sickie, and do just exactly what you really most of all want to do, what would that be?

I'd curl up on the sofa with a blanket, in my pyjamas, and read the new Janet Evanovich I just got out the library, with lots of tea and the phone switched off. I might, if I was feeling energetic, put on some music at low volume.

I suspect my fantasies lack a certain degree of excitement...

3 comments:

kittenish said...

I think there's a certain decadence in shutting out the world and getting lost in a book, especially considering the modern lifestyle usually leaves little time for mental reflection.

My hypothetical sickie day would involve a languorous, early morning session between the sheets (before my other half left for work), followed by a quiet breakfast of coffee and french pastry. Then I'd spend the rest of the day working my way slowly through the pile of books that I seem to keep compulsively buying, even though I know I don't have time to read (!)

For me, this would be an extremely guilty pleasure, given I have a Ph.D thesis to finish by August, and am trying to get a story ready for submission to an erotica anthology.

Of course, I am not panicking at all. Not in the slightest.

Nikki Magennis said...

Snap, kittenish!

Funny, isn't it, that such simple pleasures seem so wrong...?

As for the thesis and the story, relax. I'm sure you'll get them done. Good luck!

Lively Lad said...

There's a right hoolie ablowing outside here on Orkney, with a forecast of blizzards later, so good time to declare a sickie,stoke up the log fire, open a decent bottle of Chateaux La Fleur-Milon, wrap myself in my big towelling robe and immerse myself in 'Flaubert in Egypt' - transporting myself back in time to that birthplace of erotica - "As for the coups, they were good; the third especially was ferocious, and the last tender - we told each other many sweet things" Anyone else out there read it I wonder? He was way ahead of his time in this genre (1849-50)